Flags will fly at half mast around the City today in remembrance of the victims and families of the 2013 Boston Marathon Bombings.  For details about support services available to community members on the one-year anniversary of these tragic events, click here.

In Boston, a tribute ceremony for survivors and first responders will be held at the Hynes Convention Center at 12:00 p.m.  You can watch the ceremony online here.  Community members are also invited to gather along Boylston Street this afternoon, and to share in a moment of silence which will take place at 2:49.

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April 10th-13th is  the 14th annual  Boston National Poetry Month Festival, hosted primarily by the Boston Public Library in partnership with Tapestry of Voices and the Kaji Aso Studio.

The Festival begins on Thursday evening, April 10th, with a program of Poetry, Music & Dance at Old South Church, produced by Berklee College of Music professor, Lucy Holstedt.  Friday, April 11, National Book Award winner David Ferry is just one of 15 prominent “Keynote Poets” reading in the Commonwealth Salon room.  Saturday and Sunday, 60 established and emerging poets read in Rabb Lecture Hall: they range from Boston Poet Laureate Sam Cornish and State Rep. Denise Provost to gifted students from Boston Latin High School and Boston Arts Academy as well as a Harvard University student.

The entire Festival is Free, and includes two Open Mics, plus a workshop with noted poet Tom Daley.  For specifics on times, locations, and more, click here.

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By Lawrence Raab

The last few gray sheets of snow are gone,
winter’s scraps and leavings lowered
to a common level. A sudden jolt
of weather pushed us outside, and now
this larger world once again belongs to us.
I stand at the edge of it, beside the house,
listening to the stream we haven’t heard
since fall, and I imagine one day thinking
back to this hour and blaming myself
for my worries, my foolishness, today’s choices
having become the accomplished
facts of change, accepted
or forgotten. The woods are a mangle
of lines, yet delicate, yet precise,
when I take the time to look closely.
If I’m not happy it must be my own fault.
At the edge of the lawn my wife
bends down to uncover a flower, then another.
The first splurge of crocuses.
And for a moment the sweep and shudder
of the wind seems indistinguishable
from the steady furl of water
just beyond her.
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Based on values identified in SomerVision, Mayor Joe Curtatone invited residents to share their ideas for investing in four key areas:

  • Public Health
  • Arts and Culture
  • Community Engagement and Immigrant Outreach
  • Recreation

The City held three Community Budgeting meetings and solicited ideas online.  Now, they’ve gathered all the ideas and need need your help to prioritize them!

Click here to see the list of ideas that were generated by the community.  If you see an idea you like, vote it up. If you see an idea you’re not keen on, vote it down.

And if you’re interested in learning more about Somerville’s budget, click here.

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The Light Comes Brighter
by Theodore Roethke (1908-1963)

springThe light comes brighter from the east; the caw
Of restive crows is sharper on the ear
A walker at the river’s edge may hear
A cannon crack announce an early thaw.

The sun cuts deep into the heavy drift,
Though still guarded snow is winter-sealed,
At bridgeheads buckled ice begins to shift,
The river overflows the level field.

Once more the trees assume familiar shapes,
As branches loose last vestiges of snow.
The water stored in narrow pools escapes
In rivulets; the cold roots stir below.

Soon field and wood will wear an April look,
The frost be gone, for green is breaking now;
The ovenbird will match the vocal brook,
The young fruit swell upon the pear-tree bough.

And soon a branch, part of a hidden scene.
The leafy mind, that long was tightly furled,
Will turn its private substance into green,
And young shoots spread upon our inner world.

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May multitudes rejoice!

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Thanks to our great new technology librarian!

We’ll let you know when wifi is working again.

Stay tuned…

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storycorps1Do you have a story you would like to share? Do you know someone with a story you want others to hear? Come to the Central Library this Saturday to tell your story or help someone share theirs. One of our volunteer facilitators will be ready and waiting from 11 am on.

This is your chance to have your voice heard and tell your story. And if you give permission, a copy will also be archived at the American Folk Life Center at the Library of Congress.

Don’t pass up this chance!

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And our primary public printer is not working. However, the printer attached to the 15-minute express is functional and available.

We are working on these problems, and will let you know when everything is up and running.

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segranJoin us at the Central Library next Thursday March 20 at 6:30 for a talk on Islamic feminism with journalist Elisabeth Segran, who’s been traveling the Muslim world and meeting women who are re-thinking and changing their place in their society.

For centuries, many Muslim women felt they had to choose between feminism and their faith; they believed that these two ideologies were mutually exclusive and incompatible. However, around the world, Muslim women are reexamining the Qua’ran and discovering that it is possible to fight for their rights from within the Islamic tradition. This talk will survey the strides that women are making to change laws and social values so that women have a more equal role within the Muslim family.

 

Elizabeth Segran is a writer who received her Ph.D. in South and Southeast Asian Studies with a specialization in Women, Gender and Sexuality from the University of California, Berkeley. She contributes to The Atlantic, The Nation, Foreign Affairs and Salon.
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